Environment

Business Owners, Residents Drying Out After Flooding in Jax Beach

Business Owners, Residents Drying Out After Flooding in Jax Beach

JACKSONVILLE BEACH, Fla. --  Some people are drying out in Jacksonville Beach after heavy rain poured down overnight.

"Oh, it was hectic. The water came up in about 45 minutes," said resident Jason Monac, who was at a nearby gas station today trying to suck all the water from the carpet in his car.

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Several inches of rain fell in just a short time.

"Before you know it, it was up to the bottom of the doors," said Monac.

Roads flooded and many cars stalled, making a busy night for tow truck companies.

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Storm May Toss Sea Turtles Ashore; How to Help

Storm May Toss Sea Turtles Ashore; How to Help

As waves from Hurricane Irene pound sandy Atlantic beaches along Florida’s east coast, they bring more than debris to shore. Small sea turtles carried from their offshore homes of floating seaweed can be cast up on the beach by the waves.


Green, leatherback, hawksbill and Kemp’s ridley turtles are federally endangered species, and the loggerhead turtle is a federally threatened species. As a result, people wanting to help these creatures should be aware of some requirements so they don’t find themselves on the wrong side of the law.


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) does not recommend going to the beach specifically to search for and rescue stranded sea turtles. However if you are on the beach and see a small sea turtle onshore that is obviously stranded and not attempting to move into the waves, please be aware of the following:

$11 Million Beach Replenishment Faces Erosion from Emily

$11 Million Beach Replenishment Faces Erosion from Emily

JACKSONVILLE BEACH, Fla. -- Just about every five years the Army Corps of Engineers puts millions of dollars worth of work and time into replenishing Duval County beaches.

It's a constant job, considering waves are a non-stop erosion machine, basically wiping out any work that gets done.

And with the remnants of Tropical Storm Emily potentially kicking the waves into high gear, that could mean even more erosion than normal. And that's if the storm stays hundreds of miles off shore.

First Coast News asked the folks at the Army Corps of Engineers if they were worried about their project being washed away, and they said no.

"Well that's the whole purpose of the project, to protect structures from hurricane damage," said renourishment project director Steve Bass.

TOMORROW: VOLCOM’s Final Summer Daze Beach Cleanup

TOMORROW: VOLCOM’s Final Summer Daze Beach Cleanup

Keepers of the Coast, a local non-profit dedicated to promoting coastal stewardship and the conservation of coastal habitat, are recruiting volunteers for Volcom’s Summer Daze Beach Clean-Up happening on Friday, July 29th.